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Oil palm wood: Asia trip brings back important findings

Members of the oil palm interest group with specialists on site in Asia – from right to left: Sunny Wee (Weinig Asia), Dr. Martin Dressler (LEUCO); Thomas Kühnelt (Weinig Concept), Dr. Ratnasingarn (UPM), Dr. Ing. Otto Leible (Weinig Concept), Goh Kun Wha (LEUCO Malaysia),  Patrick Puah (Weinig Asia), Dr. Loh (UPM), KC Nyew-Periforce
Members of the oil palm interest group with specialists on site in Asia – from right to left: Sunny Wee (Weinig Asia), Dr. Martin Dressler (LEUCO); Thomas Kühnelt (Weinig Concept), Dr. Ratnasingarn (UPM), Dr. Ing. Otto Leible (Weinig Concept), Goh Kun Wha (LEUCO Malaysia), Patrick Puah (Weinig Asia), Dr. Loh (UPM), KC Nyew-Periforce

In the future, oil palms could solve resource problems in the woodworking industry for multiple products. These plants are primarily grown on large-scale plantations in the Asia-Pacific region. Other than harvesting the oil from the plant’s pulp, this raw material has not been used for much else thus far.
In the future, oil palms could solve resource problems in the woodworking industry for multiple products. These plants are primarily grown on large-scale plantations in the Asia-Pacific region. Other than harvesting the oil from the plant’s pulp, this raw material has not been used for much else thus far.

On a trip through Malaysia, the oil palm wood interest group went on a fact-finding mission to learn about the general conditions required to sustainably use this raw material in an industrial environment.

 

The group was made up of representatives from the companies Kleiberit, LEUCO and Weinig. The itinerary included meetings with government organizations as well as visits to oil mill operations and other companies who do business in the industry. Questions primarily focused on the usability of the wood and on-site experiences with further machining.

 

“We have gained important insights into the process-reliable production of competitive intelligent products,” explains Dr. Leible from the Weinig Concept. During the talks, a series of connecting factors also resulted that support a future cooperation. “The willingness is there, however, potential investors have to be impressed by an appealing, cross-regional sales market,” adds Dr. Leible.

 

In the future, oil palms could solve resource problems in the woodworking industry for multiple products. These plants are primarily grown on large-scale plantations in the Asia-Pacific region. Other than harvesting the oil from the plant’s pulp, this raw material has not been used for much else thus far.

 

 

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